005 | Earthquaker Devices Erupter Fuzz: A Closer Look at this Ultimate Fuzz Pedal | Transcript

Transcript

Back to Episode Homepage

Scott Schwertly:
Welcome to episode five of the Sonic Renegades podcast, where we're exploring Renegade pedals that have changed the music landscape. Up for discussion today, EarthQuaker Devices Erupter Fuzz pedal.
Hey everyone, Scott Schwertly here at Siren Pedals.

Austin Bryan:
Hey guys, Austin Bryan with Siren Pedals here.

Scott Schwertly:
And today we're going to be talking about EarthQuaker Devices' really amazing, what I think is amazing, Erupter Fuzz pedal. If you love fuzz, this is the pedal to have.

Austin Bryan:
The Erupter, this is a killer pedal, Scott. I love fuzz, we both love fuzz. If you don't love fuzz, you should love fuzz. And if you don't have fuzz, you need to go get a fuzz, and this is a great fuzz pedal to get.

Scott Schwertly:
And if you don't like EarthQuaker, you need to love EarthQuaker because they put out some amazing pedals.

Austin Bryan:
Yeah, if you don't have an EarthQuaker pedal in your lineup or on your board, change that. Change that today.

Scott Schwertly:
For sure. Hopefully in future episodes, we're going to actually talk about the Hoof and the Plumes. I just love any EarthQuaker product, and this one's no exception, it is fantastic.

Austin Bryan:
Rainbow Machine, love it. So many cool effects, man.

Scott Schwertly:
So let's go ahead and dive into this one. I know, Austin, this is a pedal that lives on your board. I know you love fuzz, you love all of those rock tones, all that stuff. So I'll let you kick off with just some of the history of it.

Austin Bryan:
This is a really cool pedal. So around 2017, this pedal came out and it really, just so everybody knows, Jamie Stillman designed this really as something for himself and really to be the ultimate classic fuzz sound. And it's based heavily on, I guess inspired by heavily, by the Fuzz Face. But interestingly enough, right out of the gate when you pull it out of the box and plug it in, it just nails a really solid fuzz tone. There isn't really much to have to dial in, it really is just hit the switch and go. It has a huge low end to it, it's not very mushy at all.
And what I really, really appreciate about it is it cuts in the mix just the way you would want and need your guitar to cut. Which sometimes fuzz pedals, people feel like it's hard for your guitar to cut through the mix. But I find with the Erupter that you can actually dial this in and really get some good range out of this one Bias knob that's on here. I mean, complicated controls, folks. A lot of knobs on this guy. Really, no. Just one Bias knob, which we can talk a little more on that. But overall, it's a great tone if you're really just wanting to buy a professional sounding fuzz and want something that's classic yet a new pedal, go for the Erupter.

Scott Schwertly:
And this has that fixed output level, right, where you can kind of get the thickest possible fuzz you can imagine?

Austin Bryan:
It does. So it's like if you go to the left, you get this more Velcro-ey type ripping effect out of their fuzz tone. So it's really, really crazy. It sounds a lot like your early seventies, late sixties ripping Velcro fuzz. And then if you go into the center, which is about pretty much like the Goldilocks effect where it's like, this is just right. A lot of players, and myself, like to keep that Bias knob just set in the center. But as you start turning it clockwise, it gets a lot cleaner and more refined in the output level. It gets a little bit louder, which is really, really cool.
But if you want to set something in between that center detent is really what they consider, and what Jamie and EarthQuaker consider, the perfect fuzz setting. But if you do want something a little more gated and something that has a little bit less of a level, turning it counterclockwise to the left is going to give you that really, really nice Velcro ripping sound. Two years of research development, swapping transistors, adding controls, changing things, this is what Jamie and the guys and gals at EarthQuaker came up with.

Scott Schwertly:
And this pedal is fairly new, right? I think, didn't Jamie create it... Didn't it actually come out in 2017?

Austin Bryan:
2017, yeah, so it's still pretty recent. But finding it on a lot of boards on the internet and a lot of people sharing one of these beautiful pedals on their board.

Scott Schwertly:
Definitely. Well, let's talk about some artists that are actually using it. I know, given that it is such a young pedal, obviously it doesn't quite have that history and nostalgia that you would find with some other pedals that we've covered in this podcast. But we were able to find a few folks that actually use it. I know Jesse Tobias, formerly with the Red Hot Chili Peppers, he was there just for a brief stint, I know he's a big user of the Erupter. There's Alan Day from Four Year Strong, I think a few others as well.

Austin Bryan:
Alain Johannes, who's a great multi-instrumentalist and vocalist. He's played with a lot of groups, definitely check him out online. He's worked with a lot of legendary bands, but he's got one on his board. So still a pretty new-ish pedal, but it's working its way into a lot of boards and into a lot of folks' rigs.

Scott Schwertly:
So really with any EarthQuaker device, it's really hard to nitpick EarthQuaker. They really do put together some really stellar pedals and products. When I was testing out this pedal myself, there's really not a whole lot that I can pick about it that's really that bad, other than if you want to say that it's overly simple is a bad thing. I don't really think that's anything worth pinpointing.

Austin Bryan:
Matter of taste. It really comes down to the player. It's hard to really put a lot of cons on this guy because really, it really just comes down to the player. I know some folks prefer a lot of controls, that are veteran players. Seasoned players that like to have a lot of different adjustment and like to have all those possibilities. Myself, I sometimes like to have a fuzz where it's just one knob and set it, ready to go. It just depends on the player.

Scott Schwertly:
And I know you've had a lot more experience with this pedal than I have. I've heard here and there that sometimes it can be a little bit loud in certain areas. Have you noticed that with your own playing?

Austin Bryan:
It can. While it is really cool that you have that Bias knob, which is great because it's just really the key to finding that tone you're looking for in the... However you want that fuzz to sound, you can really fine tune that. But with the volume, yeah, if you're trying to get some volume adjustment with it, it can be a little tough because you don't have a volume control. It's just on and that Bias knob, that's it.

Scott Schwertly:
Well, let's talk about that Bias knob because again, I know you love the simplicity of this pedal. I love it as well, it's nice to have a pedal like this where it is just one knob. Where right now when I think about most of the pedals that are my board they're a little bit more, I don't want to say complicated, but it's not as easy to use as this one. Because it is very, very straightforward with that Bias knob. So let's go ahead and talk about the things that we do love. Obviously, the Bias knob is amazing, there's just so much that comes from it.

Austin Bryan:
All you need to know really just looking at this, so what is this and how do I use it? If it's in the center position, which it has this detent where it'll just lock in the middle position, that's what they consider to be the perfect fuzz setting, as I mentioned. If you go to the right, if you go clockwise, it's going to be louder. We mentioned the volume aspect. If you go to the right, it's going to get louder and it's going to be a more refined fuzz tone. But if you go to the left counterclockwise, it's going to be a lot more gated and it's going to have a lot more... The volume will change and be a little bit lower output.
So simple enough, but if you're playing big chords, you're wanting to basically throw a fuzz anywhere into your signal chain, that's another perk of this pedal. It actually has a buffered front end to give it the best possible input signal. So it can go anywhere. You can actually put it in or around, basically in front of a wah pedal or you could put it in front of things that normally you wouldn't ever be advised to put a fuzz pedal in front of. And that's one little cool tidbit of that.

Scott Schwertly:
So if you're curious to see what this bad boy actually sounds like, we're going to play a few riffs here. So we're going to go ahead, and since we're dealing with fuzz, we've brought in a Les Paul today. I think this Les Paul here has Gibson '57 Humbuckers on it.

Austin Bryan:
Fuzzy riffs and Humbuckers, good choice.

Scott Schwertly:
So nice little combo. So we're going to shut up here for a moment, play few riffs for you, and we'll be right back.

Austin Bryan:
Fuzz, fuzz, fuzz, fuzz, fuzz, fuzz.

Scott Schwertly:
I love it so much, this sounds so good.

Austin Bryan:
The riffs, man. When you're using a fuzz pedal, it's like kicking on star power, it really is. It's an amazing feeling and getting to hear that Bias knob and hearing that shift is really, really cool. So if you are looking for a simplistic fuzz where you've got some great tones right at stomp of the switch, this is it.

Scott Schwertly:
And it's really not that bad, I think cost-wise, it's like $149. I believe, I think I saw it on Sweetwater, Amazon, some other places. So it won't set you back too much and in exchange, you get yourself a fantastic fuzz pedal.

Austin Bryan:
Great quality, very reliable, and some classic yet modern fuzz tones all from one switch and one knob.

Scott Schwertly:
So not too bad. So, thanks for joining us on this episode. Hopefully you've got better insight now, if you were contemplating about getting EarthQuaker Devices Erupter. Hopefully at this point, maybe you're sold on that fact. It's a great pedal, highly recommend it. And join us in our next episode where we're going to talk about the historic ProCo RAT.

Austin Bryan:
The RAT.

Scott Schwertly:
Got to love the RAT. I know we both have a RAT on our board.

Austin Bryan:
Who doesn't have a RAT, Scott? Everyone has a RAT, it's a great pedal. A great effect and a classic, so I can't wait to dive into that one.

Scott Schwertly:
Yeah, me too. Well, we'll catch you in the next episode and until then have a great day, have a great week. And we'll see you on the other side.

Austin Bryan:
See you later.

Close (esc)

Get Our Free eBook!

Do you love dirt as much as we do? Learn the rich history behind all the overdrive and distortion pedals you know and love. Download our free ebook, The History of Guitar Distortion.

Age verification

By clicking enter you are verifying that you are old enough to consume alcohol.

Search

Shopping Cart

Your cart is currently empty.
Shop now