026 | Siren Pedals Airavata: A Closer Look at this Beast of a Distortion Pedal | Transcript

Transcript

Back to Episode Homepage

Scott Schwertly:
Hello, and welcome to episode 26 of the Sonic Renegades podcast, where we're exploring renegade pedals that have changed the music landscape. Up for today, we've got one of our very own. This is the Airavata distortion pedal. It's loaded with lots of goodies, and we can't wait to unpack it for you guys today.

Hey everybody, Scott Schwertly and Eric Wilson of Siren Pedals with you guys today. Hope you guys are having a great start to your week, or a great start to your day. And today we're excited to be talking about one of our very own. Today we're going to be talking about the Airavata distortion pedal. We absolutely love this one, and maybe we're a little bit biased, but we do love it. And we're excited to be talking about this one for you guys today. It's a newer pedal, so it doesn't have quite the rich history and legacy as some other pedals that we've discussed on this channel. But nonetheless, we're excited about what it offers, and we can't wait to unpack this beauty or a gem of a pedal for you guys today.

Eric, I know you've built your fair share of these. You have your fair share of solder burns and everything else from building these. I know it's got a close place in your heart.

Eric Wilson:
Yeah, I threw it on my board for a little while. I was using a JHS Kilt for a while and wanted to try it out considering I build them all the time, and I've really enjoyed having it on there. And it's been a really great addition to what I've been using, so I love it.

Scott Schwertly:
Yeah. Likewise, I've also got it on my board. And one thing that's interesting too about being a pedal builder or a pedal owner is, I think with anybody, everybody has insecurities. And sometimes I don't like to have Siren pedals on my board. Not that they're bad. It's almost like if you see yourself on camera, or you see yourself on video, nobody ever really likes to see themselves on screen. And the same thing, I think, for me, applies with pedals. I don't typically like to have my pedals on my board. I don't know. Maybe it's just some deep embedded insecurity or something, but for whatever reason, with that said, the Airavata is one of our pedals that I actually do have on my board. And it beat out my Boss DS-1, and it also beat out my TC Electronic Dark Matter pedal because it kind of does both. So it's earned that coveted spot and it's been on there for a while now. So I've really, really enjoyed it.

Eric Wilson:
Yeah. I think my favorite thing about it is the addition of the shape knob. Cause it just gives you the little bit extra tone shaping capabilities that you kind of want from other pedals that are in the similar vein. So I've really enjoyed having that.

Scott Schwertly:
Oh yeah, it definitely has lots of different bells and whistles like that one. And we'll definitely go through those for you guys today. And if this is your first time hearing about the Airavata, again, we'll definitely go through the knobs and what you can expect. And obviously we'll go through our demo and all that.
So, as mentioned before again, this is one of our own. Maybe this is kind of a shameless plug or whatnot, but we feel like it's about time. We've covered a lot of pedals and figured, you know what, we're in the pedal business, let's go ahead and talk about one of our own babies, and that being the Airavata pedal. So for those of you that are new to it, as we mentioned, it is a young pedal. So the Airavata actually came out this year. In fact, it came out at the end of January, cause it's only been on the market just for a few months. And it's essentially a RAT inspired distortion pedal with a ton of other options, and bells, and whistles. And we'll take the time during this episode to actually walk you through that and, again, kind of clarify on what you can expect.

Eric Wilson:
Yeah. Speaking of the different changes and stuff, we'll go ahead and walk you through the knobs, and the clipping switch, and kind of what you can expect. So it's a four knob pedal, so you have your volume distortion and filter knobs. That's about where the similarities are, what they're at, and that's kind of where they end, because then we add the shape knob and then the clipping switch as well.

So that clipping switch, center is the stock sound, left is going to brighten up your tone. And then, once you flip that to the right, your tone is going to get a little bit larger, maybe a little bit darker, just a little bit bigger in general.
And then we have the shape knob, which as you turn it to the left, you get more high end. As you turn it to the right, it expands your signal and you get a more full, well-rounded distortion tone. And then the distortion control is really great. It can go from a medium gain distortion all the way to crazy mess of distortion. So it's really great. I love it.

Scott Schwertly:
Yeah, it's a ton of fun. Lately I've been playing a lot just for fun and kicks and giggles, like Jack White and White Stripes. And this pedal really shines for that. And then not only can you play that, but you can play a variety of other things as well, just based on the diversity of distortion tones that it provides. And I don't know about you, Eric, I'd actually be curious to see where you are in this one. So we've got the three clipping options, as you mentioned, center stock, to the far left, which is sort of clipping setting number one, it's essentially brighter, probably a little bit more compressed. And then to right, as you said, it's a little bit darker, a little bit larger. I know, personally, when I think about the Airavata that's on my board, I typically probably stay to the left. That's kind of my preferred destination when playing stuff. Since you've been playing with it a little bit here, where do you typically have yours?

Eric Wilson:
For me? I actually typically keep it to the right, and I really haven't moved it. I literally flipped it to the right, I like how it sounded, and I just kept it there. That's kind of how I am. If I find one thing on a pedal that I really like, I'll typically just keep it there because it's easier.

Scott Schwertly:
Yeah. That's interesting that we're both on the opposite ends, but we also obviously play different stuff. So again, testament to the variety that's provided there. So the clipping options, to me, that was probably one of the most exciting features when conceptualizing this pedal and, and thinking through what we wanted to include. The three clipping options, I just loved the added benefit that you get from that. And I was really excited about the whole idea of the shape knob. As you mentioned earlier, and I'll just repeat this, if you're all the way down, it's a little bit more hairy. If you turn it to the right, it gets a little bit more rounded. And, again, it just gives you so much extra tonal options there as compared to the original RAT, where you did not have that or you don't have that as an option. So it just provides a world of other things that you can try and test, and really just makes it a fantastic pedal.

Eric Wilson:
Yeah. I know I had another RAT style pedal on my board for a while, and it was really great and I loved it. I mean, obviously, it lived down there for a while. But the one thing I was missing is, it didn't matter what you did, there was so much low end in it and there was no way to clean it up at all. Cause all you had is the filter knob. So it's just a cut. So as you cut out the high end, cause I also didn't like the shrill high end, so as you cut out the shrillness, you also add in more bass. And so having the shape knob enables me to be able to balance the two, and that way I can get exactly what I'm looking for instead of having to sacrifice and just live with it. That's what I've personally really enjoyed about it.

Scott Schwertly:
Same. I had a RAT on my board for a while as well, and I was switching that out between, as I mentioned, the Boss DS-1 and the TC Electronic Dark Matter. The RAT was actually on there for quite some time, but, ever since releasing the Airavata again, it's earned that distortion spot. No regrets, I'm loving it so much.
If you guys are curious too about the artwork behind this, obviously there are many different ways to pronounce Airavata. JayLeonardJ actually did a demo of our pedal not too long ago and he, I think, had three or four different variations on how to pronounce it. For us as Siren Pedals, us being the owners of the Airavata, obviously we just prefer to call it the Airavata. But obviously it's a three headed elephant.

The thought process behind that was obviously you want tone stomping distortion. You want something aggressive, but also somewhat friendly as well. So the whole idea of a three headed elephant, that three clipping options as being the hallmark or the centerpiece of this pedal, that was really the inspiration behind it. We wanted something inviting yet a little intimidating that really would embody the whole idea of what a distortion pedal should be about. So that's really the inspiration behind the artwork. And Andre, who's our artist, has done all the Siren artwork, and the Airavata artwork is just another one of those great examples of his brilliant and creative work.

Eric Wilson:
Yeah, I love the artwork. Andre did a great job on that one, and honestly the rest of the pedals we have here at Siren. So it looks really great. It's a nice addition aesthetically to my board too.

Scott Schwertly:
Yeah. I know one thing that was important for me when starting Siren was to have something that would help the pedals stand apart. I mean, obviously, if you talk to anybody that's a pedal enthusiast, obviously if you're listening to this episode or this podcast, you're probably a pedal enthusiast, but it is a saturated market. There are so many options out there. A lot of great pedals, a lot of bad pedals, but I know, for me when creating this company, I wanted to have something that was going to help it stand apart a little bit. And when I found Andre and I found the work that he was creating, just super jazzed about it. And I think his creativity has been a great fit for the brand. And I just love how it's come to play through the pedal.

Eric Wilson:
Yeah, I would agree. So let's go ahead and hear how it sounds. We're going to be playing the Airavata through the Strymon Iridium, going straight into Logic. And I'm going to go ahead and use the Les Paul for this one.

Scott Schwertly:
Nice. That should sound great. So, I was actually, this weekend, using my Les Paul with the Airavata, so this will be fun to listen to. Awesome. Well, we will get this all plugged in and we will see you guys on the other side.

Eric Wilson:
All right. That was the Airavata distortion pedal. I've really enjoyed having that on my board, and I think you will too. So you can go ahead and head on over to sirenpedals.com, and pick one of those up, and let us know what you think of it.

Scott Schwertly:
And maybe I'm a little bit biased, but I think that's the best distortion ever, right? No, just kidding. But I do love it. It's so great. I'm so proud of it and glad. It was a lot of work getting that thing done, and glad it's finally out in the market. Excited to hear what you guys think about it. Awesome. Well, on that note, we're going to wrap things up. That is the Siren Airavata. Join us next time. We're going to be talking about another one of our favorite brands or favorite pedal companies. We're going to be covering another JHS pedal. Specifically we're going to be talking about the Kodiak, which is their tremolo pedal. It's a great one to have. I know, Eric, you've used this one for a little bit, and we're excited to be talking about that one in our next episode.

Close (esc)

Get Our Free eBook!

Do you love dirt as much as we do? Learn the rich history behind all the overdrive and distortion pedals you know and love. Download our free ebook, The History of Guitar Distortion.

Age verification

By clicking enter you are verifying that you are old enough to consume alcohol.

Search

Shopping Cart

Your cart is currently empty.
Shop now