040 | Walrus Audio MAKO Series D1: A Closer Look at this High-Fidelity Delay Pedal | Transcript

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Scott Schwertly:
Hello, and welcome to episode 40 of the Sonic renegades podcast. We're exploring Renegade pedals that have changed the music landscape. Hard to believe we're on episode 40 already, but today we're going to be talking about the Walrus Mako Series D1 High-Fidelity and delay pedal. I know that sounds like a mouthful, but we're going to be talking about this gem of a pedal on the other side.

Hey everybody, it's Scott Schwertly and Eric Wilson of Siren Pedals with you guys today. Hope you are having a good one. Hope you're staying safe and healthy this summer. Today we're going to be talking about the latest addition, actually it's not the latest I think the age is actually tramps this one, but one of Walrus's newest pedals. It's the Walrus Mako Series D1 High-Fidelity Delay pedal. This is actually Walrus's kind of first, I guess, step or sort of headway into the whole DSP space and this pedal is a good one, it's definitely a charmer and it basically takes a lot of what you would find in some of the bigger Pedals out there today. And they've done a great job in, in shrinking it down into a really friendly size. So really excited to be talking about this one today. If you love delay, then yeah you're most likely love this pedal.

Eric Wilson:
Yeah. I picked this thing up a few weeks ago and efforts to try something other than my timeline and it's really coming close to at least for what I use the timeline for, being able to do everything that I use the timeline for. So it's a really great Pedal. It's got a lot of capabilities for the small footprint that it does have, and it's been a really great addition to my collection.

Scott Schwertly:
Yeah. I mean, it definitely getting a lot of praise online. A lot of people are enjoying it and some people are actually like you, Eric they're considering swapping out their timeline or something similar for the smaller footprint, which is fine and great traction for Walrus obviously on this front. So if you're not familiar with this Pedal, this is basically a really kind of the initial entry for Walrus in what they're calling the Mako Series, which again, puts them into this whole DSP space, based on what we found that this is an idea that really stems back to the early part of 2019, where it sounds like Walrus is really trying to now navigate themselves into this pole arena and this puddle is kind of their first entry point into accomplishing that goal and it's a good one. So because of that this is the first Pedal by Walrus that actually has mini options on it and with that you got a lot of sort of baked in presets and the ability to customize those presets which makes it just a really [inaudible 00:03:03] and diverse Pedal.

Eric Wilson:
Yeah, and that's really where this pedal shines cause I mean, for many you can get up to 128 presets, but also even on board, you can have up to nine because there's three banks and there's three presets per bank. So it's not like you even really need to use the middy if you have a reason to use even like nine presets or something like that. So it's really great and really accessible.

Scott Schwertly:
Yeah. I mean really at the end of the day, because you're dealing with many, you have really, it's kind of like infinitely tweakable. There's so much that you can do and change and modify. So Eric, I'd be curious, I know you've had this pedal for, like you mentioned just a couple of weeks here. Yeah. What sort of customizing have you done or have you just used a lot of just the presets and what have you used as far as just kind of mini Software and well, it's been sort of your go to on that front.

Eric Wilson:
So I've been using the Disaster area the DMC for years, I had a gen2 and then I got a gen3. So I've used that a little bit to control this thing, but honestly I ended up putting this on a smaller board that I had wired up just so I didn't have to take like my larger board and with just the three presets and then I had another analog delay on the board. I really didn't need to use the media at all because between those three presets, I could have three different settings that basically covered all of the ground that I needed to cover for what I was doing but even the little bit that I have dived into the mini, it's pretty simple, there's not a whole lot you need to uncover or as far as middy goes, it's pretty easy to deal with. A lot of times middy gets a little convoluted, but it's really great, really accessible and honestly, I feel like especially settings, like the dual delay on here is really nice because it actually gives you that ping pinging effect like an old DD7 or something like that.

Scott Schwertly:
I see. I mean definitely a great feature for sure and I know for a pedal like this really kind of the shining star in this is really the short processor that they're using. I don't want to get overly technical for people that aren't living in that world with you guys like we do, but essentially really again the shining star in this pedal is that features the analog devices, sharp processor, which basically just provides a ton of processing horsepower for this pedal. The same processor is one that you would find in the pedals like the Shimano dig in other Shimano pedals as well. So it's a definitely kind of the engine behind all of it, which allows it to do what it does and the fact that it's built on that again, creates all these options that we're talking about that you can get from this pedal.

Eric Wilson:
Yeah that really Enables them to include things in like lay things out a little bit differently than maybe other delay pedals are, or even the way Walrus has done things in the past with things they've had an attack knob and a tweak knob to it and those really just kind of open it up to take it from your typical delay that has a lot of presets and really make it really versatile and give you those extra tweaking options that can get you some really interesting settings, some really interesting sounds that you might not find otherwise on other pedals or if they were on other pedals, they needed to be added through different modes or different algorithms or things like that. This really adds to the simplicity of this pedal in that just being a knob and a couple of toggle switches, it's really able to add to the simplicity of it.

Scott Schwertly:
Yeah, and speaking of those knobs for those that actually own this pedal, be [inaudible 00:06:57] feedback on your thoughts on that attack knob. I've, I've seen things online where people absolutely love it. They think it's a just a nice thing to have and then there's other folks that I've seen that actually think it may in some sense kind of kill their tone a little bit, or they just don't like it. Eric, I'd be curious to kind of just get your, your 2 cents on it. How have your thoughts been on just that specific attack knob?

Eric Wilson:
Yeah, so I mean, my thoughts are, well, first it's going to kill your tone cause you're killing the attack of like the delayed signal, that's kind of the point.

Scott Schwertly:
Yeah.

Eric Wilson:
But also it really helps to create just a really a more like lush delay as opposed to like a well-defined kind of thing. So in certain contexts it's actually better because if you just need like some sort of like ambient pad and you're looking for more of like a sustain than a traditional like, cut and dry delay. It really helps you add to that and to be able to accomplish all of that. So I've found it useful for some things like it's not like something I use all the time, but it's something that I feel like adds to the value of the pedal and honestly, like talking price wise, this pedal comes in at $300 new, you can find them on reverb for like $250 and for that price you can't get a delay that does more. So that's why I've loved this thing so much just because in price, in operation, in enmity, it's so accessible to even if you don't have that much experience or don't have the $500 to spend on a timeline.

Scott Schwertly:
Yeah, and I think that's kind of leads to this next topic of, I think a lot of people out there who are maybe getting an explosives first time are probably on the fence of, if they really want to get into delay, obviously the streaming timeline is usually up there on people's lists. This one's now being kind of included in that conversation. So yeah, if we had to make a recommendation for you guys I mean, you kind of already just summarized it there Eric, with for a lower price point you're kind of getting a lot of the great features that you would get on something like a timeline obviously with the whole mini capability. Yeah, since I know you've used this pedal a lot more than I have. Yeah, for that person out there, who's listening right now and they're thinking about timeline versus this D1. Yeah, what are your thoughts if you want to elaborate on what you've shared already?

Eric Wilson:
Yeah, I think if you were looking at something like a timeline or like an even tide time factor, but you're not a 100% sure you want to completely buy into the middy control and all of that. This is a great place to start, because in my opinion, if you're not a fan of using something like this, that's pretty simple and pretty easy to use, then you're probably not going to like going further into that world just in general. So it's a really great starting point and I think you really have nothing to lose because so far from what I've seen, the pedals they do retain their value pretty well and they're very steady. They look great and they're just super, super easy to use.

Scott Schwertly:
Nice, so yeah just something for folks to consider out there again, if you're in that world and really starting to get into the world of delay and you're considering your options. Yeah, definitely a pedal to kind of consider in that mix. Well, let's actually go ahead and jump into really the details I mean, there's obviously a lot of bells and whistles that come with this we're dealing with six knobs, three toggle, switches, middy and all this stuff. So we're just going to give you guys just a quick high level view of really kind of what you can expect with all the different things that are on this pedal.

Eric Wilson:
Yeah. So the first thing to note is just in ins and outs, there's a lot of different options. So you can do Mano and Mano out, Stereo in, Mano out, Mano and Stereo out... and so it's like just right there you have a lot of options as far as like the way you want to put it on your board. So get that one out of the way but yeah, there are six knobs and from left to right, top to bottom, it's time repeats, mix, tweak the program and then attack then you have your three switches under that which the first switch corresponds the tweak control the second switches is your bank, and then third switch is your subdivision. So just rolling through these really quick, the time the minimum amount of delay time is 60 milliseconds and then it goes all the way up to 2000 milliseconds of maximum delay time.

And then for your repeats NAB, obviously that's going to control how much your signal repeats and then your mix, also pretty self explanatory. Where this pedal really gets interesting is in that tweak control. So normally you would have for example on a timeline, you have like your parameter one, or you have the filter in grit knobs, which on the timeline kind of correspond to, if there's like specific controls for whatever algorithm you're using will typically be mapped there or be stuffed in a menu somewhere. So what this tweak control does is it makes it really easy to where you have the switch under it corresponds with it, you have mod toner age, and then whichever way you switch the switch and then move the knob, it'll correspond to that setting. So I hope that makes sense, but that's kind of the general overview of that knob.

That really enables it to be able to do so much with taking up such little space. Then with delay programs you have five different programs. So there's a Digital delay, a Modulator delay, a Vintage delay, a Dual delay, and then a Reverse. So digital is going to be your typical like boss style delay. A modulating is going to kind of add a chorus thing effect, do it a little bit. Vintage is going to be more similar to like a Tape or a Bucket per grade delay that kind of rolls off some of the top end. Then your Dual delay can run two delays in parallel. So in the coordinator position, it'll run a quarter note and a quarter note triplet and then in the eighth note position, it'll run an eighth note and a quarter note triplet and then in the data day position it'll run a quarter note and then that eighth repeat.
So, and then there's the reverse program, which if you've ever owned a DD5 or something similar, then you know about the reverse delay and how cool that can be. So all of the different programs I found really useful, I feel like on my timeline, there's a few of them that it's just like, I've never touched and I probably never will touch, but I feel like with this one, everything you have is usable and it's kind of like your essentials of your different delay programs.

Scott Schwertly:
Yeah, I mean, definitely just a ton of variety, a lot of options and again, you get that lower price point which is great. So, and the smaller footprint. So for those that don't want and obviously know right now pedal train Nanos and the smaller size things. We tend to be kind of navigating that direction a little bit, so it doesn't hurt to have the smaller footprint with all these different things at your disposal which is awesome. So with that said, we are going to go ahead and jump into a sampling of this for you guys. So we're going to get everything connected here, Eric guitar of choice for today?

Eric Wilson:
Probably going to go with the Tele again.

Scott Schwertly:
Nice. Awesome, well, we will get everything set up and we will see you guys on the other side.

Eric Wilson:
That was Walrus D1 delay. I've loved having it and I mean, I'm still tossing around the idea of replacing my timeline with it. So I would highly recommend at least going to your local music store, trying it out and see what you think.

Scott Schwertly:
Yeah, wow! That's a big statement if you're thinking about getting into your timeline, which is obviously one of the popular staples for delay, so that's a big statement...

Eric Wilson:
Yeah. Yeah, well, I've had the timeline for like five, six years now. So it's been here a while.

Scott Schwertly:
Yeah, yeah. Maybe it's time for a change.

Eric Wilson:
Yeah.

Scott Schwertly:
So, well, good deal. Well, that is what we wanted to cover today. Again, that is the Walrus Audio Mako Series D1 High Delay Pedal. Join us next time, we're going to kind of go in a little bit of a slightly different path though, we're actually not going to cover a pedal in the next episode, but we're going to be covering the sound stone. So if you like things like the Ebo, or typically when I think of like the Ebo or the sound stone, basically, it's those things that provide a ton of sustains typically kind of the generic sort of EBO sound zone type song.
I typically think of like YouTube with, or without you. Yes. Kind of amazing sustain. And we're going to be exploring that. In fact, it's going to be arriving in the mail here in the next day or two. So I'm excited to share that one with you guys and yeah. See what it's all about.

Eric Wilson:
I haven't used an E-bow or anything like that in years, so it'll be fun to try that out and see if I should go pick one up.

Scott Schwertly:
Yeah, definitely. Well, I'm excited to check it out. I've never used one myself so, but your see what it's all about. So we'll be covering that in the next episode until then have a great day, have a great week. And we will see you next time.

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