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064 | Fulltone OCD: A Closer Look at this Obsessive Compulsive Drive Pedal | Transcript

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Scott Schwertly:
Hello, and welcome to episode 64 of the Sonic Renegades podcast. We're exploring renegade pedals that have changed the music landscape. Up for today's discussion, we have another Fulltone pedal. This is the Fulltone OCD. This thing has a really interesting history behind it and fans who love certain versions of it, and we're excited to talk about this one in more detail. We'll see you on the other side.

Hey everybody, Scott Schwertly and Eric Wilson of Siren Pedals with you today. Hope you are having a great one. Well, today we are featuring another Fulltone product. This is the Fulltone OCD. Specifically the one that we have in our possession is the Fulltone OCD version 1.4. There are nine different iterations of this thing all with their own fans and admirers, and we're going to talk about some of that today. Excited to have this one on the schedule.

Eric Wilson:
Yeah, I remember this was one of the first overdrive pedals that I actually got to play. And so it holds that place to me as one of the first pedals that I got to play and yeah, it's a great overdrive.

Scott Schwertly:
Oh yeah, it's fantastic and I've always been a fan of Marshall, and this pedal is really a Marshall in a box. And if you love that sort of tone, this is what this pedal is all about. It definitely captures that really, really well. And some of these versions capture it better than others. Again, it's all subjective. It's all up to the user. But yeah, if you're chasing that Marshall sound, you can find it within this pedal.

Eric Wilson:
Yeah. I remember when I was first starting out, I wasn't really sure if I liked the sound of this thing just because it was such an amp in the box tone and I was looking for like more of the transparent thing, I guess, but now as I've grown as a guitarist and just progressed on, I really do enjoy the tone of this thing and just everything it brings to my rig, and yeah.

Scott Schwertly:
Yeah. If you're new to the world of the OCD pedal, maybe you're on the hunt to go buy one, or maybe you have one and you just simply want to learn more, there's definitely a fun and interesting history behind it. This pedal actually first launched to the world in 2005. It's been around for quite some time and there've been many different iterations of it, again, each one containing their own fans that admire.

Just at the very high level, there are essentially nine different versions. You've got the original 1.1 and then there's a 1.2, a 1.3, a 1.4, a 1.5, a 1.6. Mike Fullerton doesn't really necessarily want to acknowledge a lot with the 1.5, 1.6. There's really not a lot of them out there. There's 1.7, which was the last one right before they got into V2, and then there's also a GE version as well, so nine altogether, again, each one containing their own fans and admirers, and again, for our conversation today, specifically as we get into the demo, this is a 1.4.

Eric Wilson:
Yeah. Well, actually I guess it would be a 1.6 because the weird thing about the 1.5s and the 1.6s is that they're built on boards that all say 1.4. If you're not confused yet, you are now. So yeah. I'm not entirely sure what this is. It's either 1.4 or 1.6, but it sounds great. It sounds like an OCD and let you be the judge.

Scott Schwertly:
Yeah, definitely. Again, keeping things at a very big picture perspective, again, there's 1.1, which is the original. Based on what we found and just in our research, 1.2 through, I believe, 1.5 contain more mid-range, less lows and highs, and then 1.6 and 1.7 have more of a ... Actually, I take that back, guys. I think 1.2 through 1.7 is more mid-range, less lows and highs. When they're rolled out V2, it's actually a neutral mid-range with low lows and high highs. Yeah, lots of changes. I know they changed some of the values on these here and there. Generally speaking, they all kind of sound the same. I think V2 is probably a significant difference from the V1 models, but yeah, lots to absorb obviously.

Eric Wilson:
Yeah. When I went and did a little bit of research and just watched some ... There's a few people on YouTube who have lined up all eight, excluding the germanium one, and honestly it's like version one's different, two through seven are almost the same and then version two is very different. It's like different, same, different.

Scott Schwertly:
Yeah. Really, again, as we mentioned, at the end of the day, it'll be up to you to decide which one you want to own if you want to add something like this to your collection. Now, there are a number of people that are obviously huge fans of this. Eric, what was that number that you'd mentioned right before we started this episode? I think one that has sold like 70,000 units? Do you remember-

Eric Wilson:
Yeah, so this one's serial number is up in the mid 70,000s, so it's not doing too bad.

Scott Schwertly:
Yeah. I mean, so they've obviously moved a lot of these and it's adored by many for good reason. A lot of folks out there love this and this thing has been on my radar for quite some time. It wasn't really until maybe a month or two ago that I actually decided to add one to my collection. But yeah, I mean, it's solid. It's used by a number of famous people, as well as regular players, anybody like Eric Johnson to Peter Buck to Keith urban. I know even people like Johnny Bucklin use it mainly as a boost type pedal, which is interesting. So yeah, lots of famous musicians that are huge fans of this thing.

Eric Wilson:
Yeah, definitely. And I've had countless friends who have had this on or off their boards at some point. I know a lot of people who start with this as one of their main overdrives so yeah, it's a great pedal and it's super well-built. I mean, these things are built like tanks, so it's just solid metal. It's got some nice weight to it. You could chuck it at somebody if they make you mad at a gig.

Scott Schwertly:
Yeah. And speaking of just size and format, we'll just quickly walk you guys through the knobs and what you can expect. This one here is pretty straightforward. You've got three knobs and a toggle switch. Eric, do you want to run everybody through it?

Eric Wilson:
Yeah. The controls on this thing are really simple, like you said. I mean, you have volume, drive and tone and then you have a high peak and low peak switch. What that means is with the high peak, you get increased distortion through the drive knob's range. Then the low peak switch, you get more accuracy to how your guitar and how your amp are sounding together. It's ideal for, like you were saying, how Johnny Bucklin uses it, more of a clean boost kind of situation and things like that and just the lower drive settings.

Scott Schwertly:
Yeah. I know for me, I've always enjoyed the high peak setting. That's kind of been my thing, but yeah, I probably need to explore the low peak option a little bit more, but no, yeah, the high peak has definitely been my go-to recently.

Eric Wilson:
Yeah. Pretty much when I used one of these, I pretty much always had it in low peak. I almost never used it in high peak, but yeah. I mean, they both sound great. It just depends on what you're doing.

Scott Schwertly:
Yeah, for sure. And one thing I've noticed too about these, at least a lot of people rave that it's really great with bright amps. That's just kind of a great combo. I don't know. Have you noticed that with any of your playing, Eric?

Eric Wilson:
Yeah. I definitely have enjoyed the way this interacts with things. I have an old '90s AC30 and it sounds really great with that. It does work really well with bright amps. You can get it to work nice with darker amps, like a Fender Hot Rod Deluxe, because I had one of those for a long time and that sounded good too, but it definitely shines with brighter amps.

Scott Schwertly:
Yeah, I know on my Iridium I know have been using the chime setting quite a bit, so mimicking the AC30 sound and yeah, this thing's been fun to play with that, so yeah. Yeah. Highly recommended. I've had a lot of fun with it over the last couple of days, really over the last several months since I've owned it. So yeah, definitely go check it out if you guys don't have one.

Scott Schwertly:
All right. What we're going to do now is we're going to go ahead and get this thing plugged in and give you guys a sample of what it's all about. So yeah. Eric, what guitar do you think you're going to go with for this one?

Eric Wilson:
I'm going to use a Les Paul for this one.

Scott Schwertly:
Perfect. Well, we're going to get the set up and as always, we'll see you guys on the other side.

Eric Wilson:
Alright. That's the Fulltone OCD. Great sounding drive pedal. I mean, you can normally pick these up pretty cheap, especially in the used market nowadays, especially if you're looking for one, like this one, that's a little bit older than version two, and yeah.

Scott Schwertly:
Yeah. I mean, they're pretty easy to find, so they're all over the place.

Well, there you have it guys. That's what we wanted to talk about. That is the Fulltone OCD, overdrive pedal. Join us next time. We're going to take a look at the MXR Timmy. Obviously the Timmy has got a really great history, Paul Cochran, all that, but this is MXR's version of it, so yeah, excited to unpack that one in the next episode.

Eric Wilson:
Yeah. I'm really curious to get my hands on that one because obviously they shrunk it down to almost nothing, and I remember I owned a Timmy back in the day, back in the day, like five years ago, whatever, but yeah, I'm just really excited to see what MXR has been able to do with that and just bring it to a larger scale.

Scott Schwertly:
Yeah, for sure. It should be a fun one. I know we are getting our hands on one. We don't have it yet, so excited to try that thing out here in the days ahead. So yeah, looking forward to that episode.

Well, until then guys, have a great day, have a great week and we will catch you in the next one.

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